POWER OF THE PLACENTA

Unlocking health today — and tomorrow

Placental blood is another significant source of stem cells, including progenitor cells, which are more versatile than the stem cells found in cord blood. Plus, placental tissue contains cells that are of interest in the developing field of regenerative medicine

Transplant Success & Survival

1. Collect the Greatest Number of Stem Cells Possible

Banking placental and cord blood is your best opportunity to maximize the number of stem cells collected. Lifebank is the first and only family bank to have pioneered the advanced technology used to obtain stem cells from placental blood as well as placental tissue.

2. Help Improve the Chances of Success

Placental blood is richer than cord blood in stem cells that have life-saving potential.1 Numerous studies have shown that using a higher number of stem cells may help to improve survival in transplant patients.2,3,4

3. Be prepared for the future of medicine

Placental blood also contains a type of stem cell that has shown promise in the exciting field of regenerative medicine.5,6,7 Banking placental blood may one day put your child and your family in the best position to take advantage of ongoing developments in this field.

The Benefits of Banking Placental Tissue

1. The Power to Divide Into Specialized Cells

Lifebank is the only family bank to have pioneered the advanced technology used to preserve both placental stem cells and tissue. Placental tissue banking involves collecting and storing tissue directly from the placenta after your baby is born. Placental tissue is a rich source of a type of stem cell that has the unique capacity to assist in the repair and regeneration of a wide variety of tissues .8

2. Placental Tissue Stem Cells Are Packed With Potential

Placental tissue is a rich source of a type of stem cell, known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), that have shown potential for use in regenerative medicine.9,10,11 Scientists discovered that MSCs are a potential tool to help regenerate damaged tissues and potentially serve as a new delivery mechanism to treat diseases. Taking advantage of the opportunity to bank placental tissue, along with cord and placental stem cells, allows you to save more unique stem cells should you need them.

Although there are currently no approved uses for placental MSCs, there are hundreds of clinical trials researching future treatments using placental MSCs for diseases including diabetes, spinal cord injuries, cartilage injuries, and ulcerative colitis.12 Lifebank has partnered in some of these trials by providing placental-derived MSCs to be used in research.

More Cells May Lead to Better Outcomes

Lifebank is the only stem cell bank to have pioneered the advanced technology used to collect stem cells from placental blood. Banking placental stem cells in addition to cord blood increases the total number of stem cells collected.

  1. Transplanting more stem cells increases the likelihood of transplant success and survival.13, 14, 15 Compared to cord blood banking alone, placental and cord blood banking yields 60-70% more of a certain type of stem cell called a CD34+ stem cell.16 Studies show that transplanting more CD34+ stem cells can lead to a significant survival advantage in transplant patients.17
Study results depicting survival probability with stem cell treatment.

These findings are from a study of 102 patients at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine and Cancer Center.17

  1. Having more cells available offers the potential for multiple treatments for your child or a close family member (blood relative)—should they need it.
  2. Placental and cord blood, along with placental tissue, contain mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and mesenchymal-like stem cells, which have the remarkable ability to assist in the repair and regeneration of cells and tissues . These types of stem cells have the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine treatments in the near future.18,19,20 By banking placental stem cells, placental tissue, and cord blood, you ensure that you save more MSCs and mesenchymal-like stem cells so that your child and your family can benefit from future treatments as they become available.
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REFERENCES

  1. Data on file, LifebankUSA; 2016.
  2. Gluckman E, Rocha V. Donor selection for unrelated cord blood transplants. Curr Opin Immunol. 2006; 18(5):565-570.
  3. Schoemans H, Theunissen K, Maertens J, Boogaerts M, Verfaillie C, Wagner J. Adult umbilical cord blood transplantation: a comprehensive review. Bone Marrow Transpl. 2006; 38(2):83-93.
  4. Scaradavou A, on behalf of the National Cord Blood Program. Unrelated umbilical cord blood unit selection. Semin Hematol. 47; 13-21.
  5. Richardson SM, Hoyland JA, Mobasheri R, Csaki C, Shakibaei M, Mobasheri A. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Opportunities and Challenges for Articular Cartilage and Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering. J Cell Physiol. 2010; 222(1):23-32.
  6. Yen BL, Huang H-I, Chien C-C, Jui H-Y, Ko B-S, Yao M, Shun C-T, Yen M-I, Lee M-C, Chen, Y-C. Isolation of multipotent cells from human term placenta. Stem Cells. 2005; 23(1):3-9.
  7. daSilva Meirelles L, Caplan AI, Nardi NB. In search of the in vivo identity of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells. 2008; 26(9):2287-2299.
  8. National Institutes of Health. Stem cell basics. Available at: http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/basics/pages/basics4.aspx. Accessed January 17, 2016.
  9. Richardson SM, Hoyland JA, Mobasheri R, Csaki C, Shakibaei M, Mobasheri A. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Opportunities and Challenges for Articular Cartilage and Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering. J Cell Physiol. 2010; 222(1):23-32.
  10. Yen BL, Huang H-I, Chien C-C, Jui H-Y, Ko B-S, Yao M, Shun C-T, Yen M-I, Lee M-C, Chen, Y-C. Isolation of multipotent cells from human term placenta. Stem Cells. 2005; 23(1):3-9.
  11. daSilva Meirelles L, Caplan AI, Nardi NB. In search of the in vivo identity of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells. 2008; 26(9):2287-2299.
  12. National Institutes of Health. Mesenchymal Stem Cells. ClinicalTrials.gov. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=mesenchymal+stem+cells&Search=Search. Accessed July 29, 2016.
  13. Schoemans H, Theunissen K, Maertens J, Boogaerts M, Verfaillie C, Wagner J. Adult umbilical cord blood transplantation: a comprehensive review. Bone Marrow Transpl. 2006; 38(2):83-93.
  14. Scaradavou A, on behalf of the National Cord Blood Program. Unrelated umbilical cord blood unit selection. Semin Hematol. 47; 13-21.
  15. Gluckman E, Rocha V. Donor selection for unrelated cord blood transplants. Curr Opin Immunol. 2006; 18:565-570.
  16. Data on File, LifebankUSA. Median increase; 2016
  17. Wagner JE, Barker JN, DeFor TE, Baker KS, Blazar BR, Eide C, Goldman A, Kersey J, Krivit W, MacMillan ML, Orchard PJ, Peters C, Weisdorf DJ, Ramsay NK, Davies SM. Transplantation of unrelated donor umbilical cord blood in 102 patients with malignant and nonmalignant diseases: influence of CD34 cell dose and HLA disparity on treatment-related mortality and survival. Blood. 2002; 100(5):1611-1618.
  18. Richardson SM, Hoyland JA, Mobasheri R, Csaki C, Shakibaei M, Mobasheri A. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Opportunities and Challenges for Articular Cartilage and Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering. J Cell Physiol. 2010; 222(1):23-32.
  19. Yen BL, Huang H-I, Chien C-C, Jui H-Y, Ko B-S, Yao M, Shun C-T, Yen M-L, Lee M-C, Chen Y-C. Isolation of multipotent cells from human term placenta. Stem Cells. 2005; 23(1):3-9.
  20. daSilva Meirelles L, Caplan AI, Nardi NB. In search of the in vivo identity of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells. 2008; 26(9):2287-2299.